About Pendragon and what we do
About the people at Pendragon
About our electronic information service
Pensions Surveys
How to contact us
Pendragon home page

Your one point of access to surveys, research and reports for the Pensions Professional

Searching for: researcher is "c d howe institute"

Surveys listed in reverse order of publication date

Results 1-15 of 17. Go to page: 1  2  
Jump to : May 2016  Jul 2015  Apr 2014  Dec 2012  Nov 2012  Aug 2012  Feb 2009  Nov 2008  Jul 2008  Jun 2008  Jan 2008  Jun 2007  Jun 2004  Mar 2004  Feb 2004  Nov 2002  Oct 2002

Worse Than It Looks: The True Burden and Risks of Federal Employee Pension Plans
Worse Than It Looks: The True Burden and Risks of Federal Employee Pension Plans
C D Howe Institute
May 2016 Canada Surpluses and Deficits, Public Sector Pensions, Countries - excl. European Union and US
A report by the C.D. Howe Institute entitled "Worse Than It Looks: The True Burden and Risks of Federal Employee Pension Plans" has revealed that Ottawa's unfunded liabilities for employee pensions stood at $269bn at the end of 2015, almost $118bn worse than reported.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> May 2016 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

4A9755F4    
 
Drawing Down Our Savings: The Prospects for RRIF Holders Following the 2015 Federal Budget
Drawing Down Our Savings
C D Howe Institute
2 Jul 2015 Canada Pension Reform, Pensioners & Retirement, Countries - excl. European Union and US
According to a report by the CD Howe Institute, the 2015 federal budget's reduction of the mandatory minimum withdrawals from registered retirement income funds will reduce the risk of Canadians outliving their savings. However, the report states that with increasing longevity and low yields on safe investments, the risk is still material.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Jul 2015 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

7C9184B2   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Ottawa's Hidden Deficit: The Widening Gap between Federal Government Pension Liabilities and Assets
Ottawa's Hidden Deficit: The Widening Gap between Federal Government Pension Liabilities and Assets
C D Howe Institute
9 Apr 2014 Canada Funding and Minimum Funding Requirement, Countries - excl. European Union and US
According to a report by the C D Howe Institute, the unfunded liability of Ottawa's federal government employees' pension plans increased to $272bn in 2013, some $120bn higher than reported.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Apr 2014 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

918356B6    
 
Ottawa's Pension Abyss: The Rapid Hidden Growth of Federal Employee Retirement Liabilities
Ottawa's Pension Abyss: The Rapid Hidden Growth of Federal Employee Retirement Liabilities
C D Howe Institute
Dec 2012 Canada Public Sector Pensions, Funding and Minimum Funding Requirement, Countries - excl. European Union and US
According to a report from the CD Howe Institute, contributions to the pension plans of federal public servants, uniformed personnel and MPs are unable to cover the increasing cost of their promises. The report reveals that the accumulated unfunded liability of these plans, using fair value accounting, stood at $267bn at the end of March 2012, almost $118bn worse than shown in the Public Accounts.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Dec 2012 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

667385FB   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Federal Employee Pension Reforms: First Steps - on a Much Longer Journey
Federal Employee Pension Reforms: First Steps - on a Much Longer Journey
C D Howe Institute
1 Nov 2012 Canada Taxation, Public Sector Pensions, Pension Reform, Funding and Minimum Funding Requirement, Countries - excl. European Union and US
The CD Howe Institute has published a report entitled "Federal Employee Pension Reforms: First Steps - on a Much Longer Journey". According to the report, whilst proposed reforms to the pension plans of MPs and federal employees are a move in the right direction, there are "deep flaws" in the plans which need to be addressed. The report calls for more sweeping reforms in order to achieve better funding and a more reasonable division of obligations and risks between taxpayers and public servants.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Nov 2012 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

45727368   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Annuities and Your Nest Egg: Reforms to Promote Optimal Annuitization of Retirement Capital
Annuities and Your Nest Egg: Reforms to Promote Optimal Annuitization of Retirement Capital
C D Howe Institute
16 Aug 2012 Canada Savings, Longevity, Countries - excl. European Union and US, Annuities and Income Drawdown
The CD Howe Institute has published a report entitled "Annuities and Your Nest Egg: Reforms to Promote Optimal Annuitization of Retirement Capital". According to the report, very few people without a workplace DB pension are choosing to annuitise even a portion of their lump sum savings in retirement.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Aug 2012 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

CA7079DA   Click here to contact the authors.
 
A Matter of Voice: The Case for Abolishing the 30% Rule for Pension Fund Investments
A Matter of Voice: The Case for Abolishing the 30% Rule for Pension Fund Investments
C D Howe Institute
Feb 2009 Canada Investment - Management, Countries - excl. European Union and US
This paper, published by the C D Howe Institute, argues that the 30% rule, which restricts the activities of Canadian pension fund managers, has a negative effect on investment decisions and should be eliminated.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Feb 2009 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

CB471132    
 
A Pension in Every Pot: Better Pensions for More Canadians
A Pension in Every Pot: Better Pensions for More Canadians
C D Howe Institute
6 Nov 2008 Canada Savings, Pensioners & Retirement, Legislation, Investment - General, Equality
This study suggests that access to retirement saving is unequally distributed between public and private sector workers. Author James Pierlot claims that Canada’s retirement saving system serves some workers better than others, depending on whether they have a career in the public sector or in the private sector. The study looks at how this unfairness in the system can be addressed and offers practical approaches to make Canada’s private retirement saving system work for everyone. Pierlot argues that to achieve retirement security for all, tax and pension legislation should be reformed to allow all workers to join pension plans and to replace the current system of annual contribution limits with a more equitable lump-sum, lifetime accumulation target of $1m or more.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Nov 2008 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

79449946   Click here to contact the authors.
 
A Better Riff on Retirement: the Case for Lower Minimum Withdrawals from Registered Retirement Income Funds
The Case for Lower Minimum Withdrawals from Registered Retirement Incom
C D Howe Institute
10 Jul 2008 Canada Scheme Issues & Trends, Investment - General, Countries - excl. European Union and US
A study by William BP Robson of the CD Howe Institute discusses how current policy forces seniors to make minimum withdrawals from Registered Retirement Income Funds (RRIFs) whether or not they make financial sense. Since 1992, when changes to the Income Tax Act last adjusted minimum withdrawals, life expectancy is up and real returns on investment are down. As a result, RRIF holders now face dramatic erosion in the purchasing power of tax-deferred savings in their later years. The required minimum withdrawals should fall, or even disappear.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Jul 2008 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

D4429148   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Risky Assumptions: A Closer Look at the Bearing of Investment Risk in Defined-Benefit Pension Plans
Risky Assumptions: A Closer Look at the Bearing of Investment Risk in Defined-Benefit Pension Plans
C D Howe Institute
Jun 2008 Canada Scheme Design (inc. DB & DC)
The difference between risk bearing in DB and DC schemes is addressed in this paper, which focuses attention on the uncertain state of knowledge regarding the manner in which wages or other forms of compensation are “traded off ” for pensions in DB plans. The study uses economic analysis to demonstrate that employees ultimately bear the cost of DB (and DC plans), even if the employer and the employee ostensibly “share” these costs.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Jun 2008 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

5B4239F5   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Safe Harbours: Providing protection for Canada's Money-Purchase plan sponsors
Backgrounder: The Pension Papers
C D Howe Institute
Jan 2008 Canada Scheme Issues & Trends, Savings, Pensioners & Retirement, Investment - General
C D Howe investigates how safe-harbour provisions can help employers enhance retirement income by reducing the fear of lawsuits if they guide employees into defined-contribution pension plans and RRSPs.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Jan 2008 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

E44073B8   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Fixing flaws in employer-sponsored pensions not enough, new pension models needed: C.D. Howe Institute
Ill-defined benefits: The uncertain present and brighter future of employee pensions in Canada
C D Howe Institute
19 Jun 2007 Canada Taxation, Scheme Issues & Trends, Pension Reform, Investment - General, Countries - excl. European Union and US, Administration
Problems besetting defined-benefit pensions in recent years are caused by defects in the model itself. What will help are tax and regulatory changes and new pension models, according to a C.D. Howe Institute Commentary. In Ill-defined benefits: The uncertain present and brighter future of employee pensions in Canada, it is argued that attempts at shoring up classic, single-employer, defined-benefit pension plans are an inadequate response. The authors say Canadians would do better to seek alternatives, and suggest, among other options, creating low-cost vehicles for pooling individuals’ investment risk.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Jun 2007 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

9D378585   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Mandatory Retirement and Older Workers: Encouraging Longer Working Lives
Deficiency in the economic case for Contractual Mandatory Retirement
C D Howe Institute
Jun 2004 Canada Pensioners & Retirement
Contractual mandatory retirement (CMR) which results from collective agreements and associated pension plans forces many older workers to leave their jobs earlier than they desire. Still permitted in most Canadian provinces, CMR has been perpetuated by economic arguments that the practice serves beneficial functions for employers and their workers. However, this paper shows the economic case for CMR to be deficient on several grounds.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Jun 2004 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

BB2443BC   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Banning Mandatory Retirement: Throwing Out the Baby With the Bathwater
The debate over whether to ban mandatory retirement
C D Howe Institute
Mar 2004 Canada Pensioners & Retirement
According to this report, mandatory retirement should not be regarded as blanket age discrimination, but rather as part of a mutually agreed company personnel policy, or collective agreement, generally negotiated by individuals with reasonable bargaining power. It should only be banned if there are explicit reasons for governments to override such private contractual arrangements.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Mar 2004 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

E421908A   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Cleaning up the pensions mess: why it will take more than money
Funding position of Canadian Pension Plans
C D Howe Institute
Feb 2004 Canada Funding and Minimum Funding Requirement
The collective balance sheets of workplace pension plans in Canada have deteriorated by some $180 billion over the course of the last three years. The researcher points out that this is not good news and that even if the missing $180 billion were magically restored tomorrow, there would still be a pensions crisis. It says this is because workplace pension plans have serious design and governance problems and only by addressing these issues can the real pensions mess be cleaned up.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Feb 2004 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

49205732   Click here to contact the authors.
 

Results 1-15 of 17. Go to page: 1  2  
Jump to : May 2016  Jul 2015  Apr 2014  Dec 2012  Nov 2012  Aug 2012  Feb 2009  Nov 2008  Jul 2008  Jun 2008  Jan 2008  Jun 2007  Jun 2004  Mar 2004  Feb 2004  Nov 2002  Oct 2002