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Searching for: researcher is "audit commission"

Surveys listed in reverse order of publication date

Results 1-3 of 3.

Under pressure: Tackling the financial challenge for councils of an ageing population
Under pressure: Tackling the financial challenge for councils of an ageing population
Audit Commission
18 Feb 2010 United Kingdom Longevity, Local Government
A report from the Audit Commission has warned that councils will struggle to cope with the financial challenges posed by the ageing population in England. The report, entitled "Under pressure: Tackling the financial challenge for councils of an ageing population", finds most councils do not know enough about the costs of their ageing population and could also miss out on the potential savings available through preventive services and better work with other organisations.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Feb 2010 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

CC52567F   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Councils unprepared for England's ageing population
Councils unprepared for England's ageing population
Audit Commission
17 Jul 2008 United Kingdom Pensioners & Retirement, Local Government
A new report from the Audit Commission, "Don't stop me now - preparing for an ageing population", has found that councils in England, particularly those which have the fastest ageing populations, are not ready to meet the challenges involved in improving services for older people. Most council services focus on the minority who require social care, excluding the invisible majority who may end up isolated and vulnerable if ignored, said the study. The report also looks at the Government’s 2005 strategy for older people, "Opportunity Age", and finds that although it has the potential to improve the lives of an ageing population, so far it has not delivered those benefits to older people across the country.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Jul 2008 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

19429657   Click here to contact the authors.
 
Report on the costs of administering local government pension funds in London
Call for pooling of London pension funds
Audit Commission
24 Oct 2006 United Kingdom Pension Reform, Occupations/Industry Sectors, Local Government, Funding and Minimum Funding Requirement, Administration
London councils could save millions of pounds by making changes to their pension administration arrangements, an Audit Commission study has found. "Efficiency challenge: Costs of Administering Local Government Pension Funds in London" suggests a range of options for change. These include creating one London-wide pension fund and establishing one pension authority to administer London council pensions whilst retaining individual councils' funding arrangements. Each of the 32 London boroughs and the City of London has separate pension funds totalling £11.8 billion with 414,000 members. On average, each fund is worth £355m and has 13,000 members. The study found that nationally, larger councils' funds are administered at a much lower cost per member. The average administration cost per London council scheme member is £126 compared to only £44 for metropolitan council funds. If London boroughs were able to reduce their total administration costs per scheme member to the level of the average metropolitan fund they would spend £34 million less each year. This scale of reduction would require significant change to take place and would therefore take time. The study found that these cost differences are due in part to the "London effect" - the higher cost of salaries and office accommodation in London - but also to the smaller scale of the 33 London schemes which means they do not benefit from the same economies of scale as other councils.

More details are generally available exclusively to subscribers of Perspective, the electronic pensions legal & regulatory information and news service. To read the summary, subscribers should launch Perspective and navigate via the Table of Documents to PensionSurveys >> Oct 2006 or click here (this link will not work in all circumstances). For further information about Perspective click here.

C73514A5   Click here to contact the authors.
 

Results 1-3 of 3.